New biotech-company grows out of research – University of Copenhagen

Forward this page to a friend Resize Print Bookmark and Share

Business Collaboration > Cases > Cases of collaboration with researchers > New biotech-company gr...

New biotech-company grows out of research

Area:

Medilets double-chambered Dualet syringe. © Medilet

Medilets double-chambered Dualet syringe. © Medilet

Pharmaceutical technology and drug delivery

Researchers:

Daniel Bar-Shalom

Collaborators:

Copenhagen Spin-OutsBioneer: FARMA

The result:

A new biotech-company with an already interested clientele

The history:

The double-chambered Dualet syringe is invented and developed by associate professor Daniel Bar-Shalom. The two chambers make it possible to, for example, mix a lyophilized drug substance with a supply liquid immediately before the syringe is to be used. This means that is it not necessary to put the medicine on ice. The chamber with the medicine is added just before use, and can therefore be delivered ready for use, and without the patients having to administer the medication doses themselves.

The experienced biotech-entrepeneur Jan Quistgaard had been mentor for Copenhagen Spin-Outs for a year, and it was in connection with this, that he became interested in the invention. He assessed that the Dualet syringe had a great market potential and no significant competitors. But definitely also because it is an instrument and not simply a pharmaceutical product, and can thus be brought on the market quicker.

Jan Quistgaard, who is now CEO of the new company Medilet, has to go out and sell the Dualet syringe, and there are already various clients interested in the product.

Medilet is the first company, which has been established based on Bioneer: FARMA, a cooperation which has been running since 2007 between the University of Copenhagen and the GTS institute Bioneer. The inventor of the Dualet syringe, Daniel Bar-Shalom, divides his time between the two institutions, which then divide the intellectual rights to the technology, which springs from the cooperation.

Sven Frøkjær, Associate Dean for Industrial Collaboration at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, explains characterizes the process with Medilet as a good example of how fruitful it is to have partnerships with set rules when working with commercialization of research.